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The wood frogs can stay Frozen for 7 months

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The wood frogs can stay Frozen for 7 months

The wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus or Rana sylvatica) has unique characteristics, the black markings around its eyes resemble a mask, colors vary in them, there can be red, gray, and green. females are more bright in color than males. They can range from 1.5 – 3.25 inches in length

Where are wood frogs found?

These amphibians are found in some parts of the United States which includes the forest of Alaska, south of Alabama, and within northwest Idaho.

Commonly found in cold environments, and have very well adapted by completely going into a frozen state during winter.

The wood frogs are the only species that live North of the Arctic region.

wood frog Adaptations

While the rivers and ponds are melting, the ground remains frozen. And under the leaf litter, the wood frog is pulling off a miracle.

The wood frog is frozen solid, even his eyes are iced, there’s no pulse and no breath.

Slowly the warmth of spring begins to thaw, from the inside out, his heart starts beating, his brain lights up and he begins to move.

It turns out that the frog’s liver pumped a syrupy, natural antifreeze into his cells in the fall. And this kept his organs from freezing.

Only the water between cells froze, after eight months frozen, he’s completely undamaged, and leaping straight for the nearest pond.

The Alaska wood frog has an astounding ability, it can produce antifreeze.

This seemingly ordinary amphibian can survive at temperatures as low as 3 degrees Fahrenheit and then come back to life.

How do wood frogs survive being frozen?

The wood frogs can stay Frozen for 7 months

When winter arrives, the wood frog prepares for the big freeze. It starts to produce huge amounts of urine but unlike us, it doesn’t excrete it out.

This waste is stored in its blood as the first ice crystals creep over the frog’s skin, an incredible transformation begins.

The water in the frog’s blood starts to freeze, the ice sucks the precious water out of the frog cells to prevent full-scale dehydration.

The liver begins to make large amounts of glucose as the sugar mixes with the urine in the blood creating homemade antifreeze.

The antifreeze prevents too much water from being drawn out of the cells by the ice outside, if they lose more than 60% of their water the process becomes irreversible.

The cells will crumple and die from frostbite, Frankly, antifreeze keeps the wood frog alive, they enter a state of suspended animation.

Its internal organs and metabolic activity grind to a near halt, the lungs stop working and the heart eventually stops beating.

The wood frog can survive for months with an incredible two-thirds of its body completely frozen to the point where they are essentially frog sickles.

How long can wood frogs stay frozen?

After grueling seven-eight months, spring arrives, the temperature is warm and the ice starts to melt.

When do wood frogs come out of their frozen state?

The wood frog also begins to thaw, water slowly flows back into the cells, they rehydrate and return to their original shape, within 30 minutes the heart restarts and the blood begins to flow.

The wood frog comes back to life after two days, the Frog heads out to look for some food, a mate, and a much-awaited excretes.

What do wood frogs eat?

Wood Frog Amphibian Animal - Free photo on Pixabay

The diets of wood frogs consist of insects, worms, spiders, ants, slugs et. c with the aid of their long sticky tongues they catch and devour their prey.

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