Christmas Yam, Sage & Garlic Seitan Roast, and More: PETA Shares Tips for a No-Meat Noel


For Immediate Release:
December 15, 2023

Contact:
Rachel Hershkovitz 202-483-7382

Norfolk, Va. – As more people earn themselves spots on Santa’s “nice” list by looking out for animals, the planet, and their own arteries, retailers across the U.S. are keeping pace by stocking delicious Christmas delectables that are free of meat, eggs, and dairy. To help hosts pick the best of these new offerings for an unforgettable Yuletide feast, PETA is sharing its favorite vegan roasts and other holiday essentials.

To give guests something yummy to snack on while they’re gathered around the tree exchanging gifts, hosts can set out this impressive vegan charcuterie assortment from Harry & David, packed with sweet and smoky salamis and an herby cheese. For dinner, the juicy and easy-to-prepare Ham Style Roast With Amber Ale Glaze from Tofurky, the Sage & Garlic Plant-Based Celebration Roast from Field Roast, or the Vegan Whole Turkey and Ham Roll from Myrtle Greens will please even the most dedicated meat–eaters. (These can be found online and at most grocery stores.) Favorite sides include Hasselback yams, mushroom Wellington, and these classic holiday recipes picked by PETA staffers. And during the dessert course, this newly launched Oat Nog from Misunderstood Whiskey Co. makes a perfect accompaniment.

“Hosts with the most compassion can serve up vegan roasts and other tasty foods that leave animals in peace, not in pieces,” says PETA Senior Vice President Colleen O’Brien. “PETA encourages us to look to our plates and extend the spirit of goodwill to animals, too, with soy to the world.”

Credit: PETA

Every person who goes vegan spares nearly 200 animals each year daily suffering and terrifying deaths, combats the climate catastrophe by slashing greenhouse gas emissions, and reduces their risk of developing heart disease and cancer. PETA’s free vegan starter kit can help those looking to make the switch.

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to eat”—opposes speciesism, a human-supremacist worldview. For more information, please visit PETA.org, listen to The PETA Podcast, or follow the group on X (formerly Twitter), Facebook, or Instagram.



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