Oak Ridge, North Carolina


Sec. 6-15. Cruel treatment prohibited.

(i) Tethering. It shall be unlawful for any person to restrain a dog using a chain, wire or other type of tethering devise in a manner prohibited by this subsection.

(1) No person shall tether, fasten, chain, tie, or restrain a dog, or cause such restraining of a dog, to a tree, fence, post, dog house, or other stationary object. During periods of tethering that are not unlawful under this subsection, any tethering devise used shall be at least ten feet in length and attached in such a manner as to prevent strangulation or other injury to the dog or entanglement with objects.

(2) No person shall tether, fasten, chain, tie, or restrain a dog, or cause such restraining of a dog, to a cable trolley system, that allows movement of the restraining devise. During periods of tethering that are not unlawful under this subsection, the length of the cable along which the tethering device can move must be at least ten feet, and the tethering device must be of such length that the dog is able to move ten feet away from the cable perpendicularly and attached in such a manner as to prevent strangulation or other injury to the dog and entanglement with objects. During periods of lawful tethering under this subsection, tethers must be made of rope, twine, cord, or similar material with a swivel on one end or must be made of a chain that is at least ten feet in length with swivels on both ends and which does not exceed ten percent of the dog’s body weight. All collars or harnesses used for the purpose of the lawful tethering of a dog must be made of nylon or leather.

(3) No person shall tether a dog with a chain or wire or other device to, or cause such attachment to, any collar other than a buckle-type collar or body harness.

(4) No person shall tether with a chain or a wire or other device to, or cause such attachment to, a head harness, choke-type collar or pronged collar to a dog.

(5) No person shall tether with a chain, wire or other device to a dog where the weight of the tethering device and the collar combined exceeds ten percent of the dog’s body weight.

(6) No person shall tether with a chain or wire or other device a dog in such a manner that does not allow the dog access to adequate food, water and shelter.

(7) No person shall tether a sick, diseased and/or injured dog, or puppy (a dog that is one year of age or younger).

(8) Notwithstanding the provisions of subsections 6-15(i)(1) and (2) of this section, a person may, subject to the provisions of subsections 6-15(i)(3)—(8), and subject to the requirement that any stationary tethering device used, shall be at least ten feet in length, and subject to the requirement that for any cable trolley system used the length of the cable along which the tethering device can move must be at least ten feet, and the tethering device must be of such length that the dog is able to move ten feet away from the cable perpendicularly, may:

  1. Tether and restrain a dog while actively engaged in:
  2. Usage of the dog in shepherding or herding livestock; or
  3. Use of the dog in the business of cultivating agricultural products, of the restraining is reasonably necessary for the safety of the dog; or
  4. Use of the dog in a lawful hunting activities if the restraint is reasonably necessary for the safety of the dog; or
  5. Use of the dog at a dog training or performance events, including but not, limited to, the field trials and obedience trials where tethering does not occur for a period exceeding seven consecutive days; or
  6. Camping or other recreation where tethering is required by the camping or recreational area where the dog is located.
  7. Any activity where a tethered dog is in visual range of its owner or keeper, and the owner or keeper is located outside with the dog. After taking possession of a dog that appears to be a stray dog and after having advised animal control authorities of the capture of dog, tether and restrain the dog in accordance with the provisions for a period not to exceed seven days as the person having taken possession of the dog is seeking the identity of the dog.
  8. Walk a dog with a handheld leash.

The post Oak Ridge, North Carolina appeared first on PETA.



Source link

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*